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Thursday, 14 September 2017

IBPS PO Quiz For English Language | 14 - 09 - 17

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 IBPS PO Quiz  For  English Language | 08 - 09 - 17


Q.1-5. In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words have been suggested, one of which fits the blanks appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.


Even as municipalities (1) with the problem of growing mounds of waste, electronic waste (e-waste) is fast emerging as a big challenge. In initial efforts to address this, Guide Foundation for Development, Hyderabad, has joined hands with Clean E-India, to try and implement safe collection and (2) methods. Clean E-India initiative was jointly launched in April 2013 by IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, and Attero, an asset management and recycling company to collect and responsibly recycle electronic waste through an approach that integrates informal waste collectors (kabadiwallahs) into an
organised network. Hyderabad is part of the four Indian cities where the Initiative was launched. Ahmedabad, Mumbai, and New Delhi are the other three.
The effort has found support from (3) electronics producers including Wipro, Samsung, Voltas, Acer, Videocon, and Haier.
The foundation will implement safe and responsible waste collection and recycling of electronic and electrical goods in Hyderabad, one of the biggest producer and Consumer of electronic gadgets in the country. It will simultaneously partner with informal sector institutions which include local scrap dealers and waste collectors for proper Collection of e-waste from institutions and homes and (4) it reaches Attero’s recycling facility in a responsible and safe manner. They are in the process of developing an online tracking system to measure e-waste flows in the formal sector. They have also appointed six franchisees in the city and are setting up collection centres at pre- identified schools
and resident welfare associations. The workers will be provided safety gears and would be (5) to work.
Hyderabad is yet to create an efficient and organised mechanism for responsible e-waste collection and disposal. The partnership with GFFD will help drive the initiative forward. Attero is an electronics asset management company and has the capability to extract pure metals from end of life products.

Q.1. Choose the correct option for (1)

(1) engage 

(2) grapple 

(3) immune

(4) seize 

(5) dodge

Q.2. Choose the correct option for (2)

(1) disposal 

(2) remove 

(3) auctioning

(4) retention 

(5) trading

Q.3. Choose the correct option for (3)

(1) nominating 

(2) leading 

(3) concealing

(4) experiencing 

(5) digressing

Q.4. Choose the correct option for (4)

(1) endanger 

(2) provide 

(3) guard

(4) suspect 

(5)ensure

Q.5. Choose the correct option for (5)

(1) compete 

(2) incapable 

(3) trained

(4) followed 

(5) qualify

Q.6-10. Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some questions.

Never underestimate the power of visualisation. It may sound like a self-help mantra, but a growing body of evidence shows that mental imagery can accelerate learning and improve performance of all sorts of skills. For athletes and musicians, “going through the motions,” or mentally rehearsing the movements in the mind, is just as effective as physical training, and motor imagery can also help stroke patients regain function of their paralysed limbs. For most of us, visual imagery is essential for memory, daydreaming and imagination. But some people apparently lack a mind’s eye altogether, and find it impossible to conjure up such visual images – and their inability to do so may affect their ability to learn and their educational performance.
Creator of a well-known web browser recently described how it feels to be blind in your mind, and his surprise at the revelation that other people can visualise things. “I can’t ‘see’ my father’s face or a bouncing blue ball, my childhood bedroom or the run I went on ten minutes ago,” he wrote on Facebook. “I thought ‘counting sheep’ was a metaphor. I’m 30 years old and I never knew a human could do any of this. And it is blowing my goddamned mind.”
We’ve known that some people cannot visualise things in their mind’s eye since the 1880s, when a controversial psychologist– one of the pioneers of eugenics – published a paper called Statistics of Mental Imagery. He set out to “define the different degrees of vividness with which different persons have the faculty of recalling familiar scenes under
the form of mental pictures”.
He asked his scientific colleagues to think of their breakfast table and describe to him the vividness of their impressions, and found this ability varied markedly – some individuals could draw up a mental image just as brilliant as the scene itself,
whereas others could only conjure up an extremely dim image, or none at all.
Today, neurologists refer to this inability to form mental images as ”congenital aphantasia” – from the Greek words a, meaning “without”, and phantasia, meaning “a capacity to form mental images” – and they believe it affects approximately 2% of the population, or one in 50 people. Remarkably, though, aphantasics do experience visual imagery in their dreams, so it seems that only voluntary visualisation is affected.
Dual-coding theory has its limitations, the main one being the assumption that thought processes are based on nothing but words and images. Nevertheless, numerous studies published since the early 1970s confirm that mental imagery does indeed play an important role in how school children acquire literacy skills.
Although aphantasia was first recognised more than one hundred years ago, there has been very little systematic research on the phenomenon, and so we still know very little about it. “We know that children with aphantasia tend not to enjoy descriptive texts, and this may well influence their reading comprehension,” says a neurologist who, together with his colleagues, gave the condition its name last year. “But there isn’t any evidence directly linking it to learning disabilities yet.”
He adds that people with aphantasia may be able to form visual images, but just don’t have conscious access to them. “The story really is still at the early stages, so the implications for education haven’t been explored,” he says. Researchers
use questionnaires to determine the vividness of mental images, and people’s scores on these tests are closely correlated to measures of activity in visual brain regions.
Thus, it may be possible to objectively measure individual differences or variations in the vividness of people’s mental images, and to identify students who have aphantasia. If it becomes clear that the condition does in fact impinge on children’s ability to learn, it may then be possible to devise alternative learning strategies for them.

Q.6. According to the passage, which of the following is not to be undervalued?

(A) Indecision 

(B) Spinelessness

(C) Wavering 

(D) Visualisation

(1) Only A 

(2) Only B 

(3) Only A and D

(4) Only D 

(5) Only B and C

Q.7. What is/are the limitations of the dual- coding theory as given in the passage?

(1) Assumption that thought processes are based on nothing but words and images.

(2) Mental imagery does indeed play an important role in how school children acquire literacy skills.

(3) Aphantasics do experience visual imagery in their dreams.

(4) Involuntary visualization is affected by aphantasia

(5) All of the above

Q.8. Which of the following options define “congenital aphantasia” the best?

(1) Involuntary visualization ability

(2) Visionary skills of the brain

(3) Inability to form mental images

(4) Ability to predict future

(5) All of the above

Q.9. What did the scientist find when he asked his colleagues to imagine their breakfast table?

A. All of them could imagine the breakfast table

B. Some could imagine the table exactly as the scene itself

C. Some could create an extremely dim image of the table

D. Some couldn’t imagine anything at all

(1) Only A 

(2) Only B 

(3) Only C

(4) All except D 

(5) All except A

Q.10. How is visual imagery essential for human beings according to the passage?

(1) Visual imagery is not as effective as physical training for musicians and athletes.

(2) Visual imagery is essential for memory, daydreaming and imagination

(3) It can also help stroke patients regain function of their paralysed limbs.

(4) Both 2 and 3

(5) All of the above

Q.11. Which of the following statement is NOT TRUE in context of the passage ?

(A) It may be possible to objectively measure individual differences or variations in the vividness of people’s mental images, and to identify students who have aphantasia.

(B) If it becomes clear that the condition does in fact impinge on children’s ability to learn, it may then be possible to devise alternative learning strategies for them.
(C) Dual-coding theory has no limitations, the main one being the assumption that thought processes are based on nothing but words and images.

(1) Only A 

(2) Only B 

(3) Only C

(4) All A, B and C 

(5) Only A and B

Q.12. Choose the word most SIMILAR in meaning to the word printed in bold, as used in the passage.

Conjure

(1) Besmirch 

(2) Answer 

(3) Command

(4) Summon

(5) Implore

Q.13. Choose the word most SIMILAR in meaning to the word printed in bold, as used in the passage.

Faculty

(1) Clumsiness 

(2) Ineptness 

(3) Need

(4) Dexterity 

(5) Competence

Q.14. Choose the word which is most nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

Voluntary

(1) Advised 

(2) Obligatory 

(3) Electoral

(4) Denizen 

(5) Autonomous

Q.15. Choose the word which is most nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning as the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

Impinge

(1) Dodge 

(2) Impress 

(3) Connect

(4) Resemble 

(5) Contrast

Answer:

Q.1.(2) For other options:
Immune (adj)- safe
Dodge (v)- avoid
Q.2.(1) For other options:
Auctioning (v)- selling
Retention (n)- keeping
Q.3.(2) For other options:
Nominating (v)- designating
Concealing (v)- hiding
Digressing (v)- moving away from the right path
Q.4.(5) For other options:
Endanger (v)- risk
Q.5.(3)
Q.6.(4) Answer is given in the 1st paragraph
Q.7.(1) Answer is given in the 6th paragraph
Q.8.(3) Answer is given in the 5th paragraph
Q.9.(5) Answer is given in the 4th paragraph
Q.10.(4) Answer is given in the 1st paragraph
Q.11.(3)
Q.12.(5) For other options:-
Besmirch- spoil
Summon- call to some place
Q.13.(4) Dexterity- expertise
For other options:-
Ineptness- inappropriate
Virtue- integrity
Q.14.(2) For other options:-
Electoral- electing
Denizen- citizen
Q.15.(1)

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