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Thursday, 16 November 2017

SSC Quiz : English Language | 16 - 11 - 17

mahendra Guru

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

India’s rising number of proposed smart cities need focused tax and non-tax revenue, both devolved and locally-generated resources, to change the reality on the ground. Otherwise, our urbanisation process would remain blighted and stunted, constraining overall economic growth. Urban local bodies can raise resources by issuing municipal bonds only if they have the viable means to service this borrowing. With 27 new cities selected under the Centre’s Smart Cities Mission, the total now stands at 60, which seems impressive. 


But the reality is that there is no clear-cut mechanism for regular resource transfers to our urban centres. The report of the Fourteenth Finance Commission reiterates the fact that constitutional provisions place “local government squarely” in the state list, with states having unquestioned discretion to assign functions and resources to municipalities. This surely needs to change. We clearly need more clear-cut mechanism design for resource transfers to our cities, generate as they do a growing and disproportionately large portion of our national income. 

The finance commission report emphasised the huge potential for local generation of funds. More realistic property tax is one avenue, as the per-capita revenue from the tax varied from Rs 42 to less than Rs 1,700 in 2012-13. There is much scope to increase revenue from vacant land, including a betterment tax. Taxes like those on hoardings and entertainment, besides octroi, will get subsumed in the goods and services tax. Besides, our cities do need to shore up user charges from utilities, public transport and parking. Further, the report suggests that local bodies be compensated for civic services provided to state and central government offices. Cities must raise far more revenues on their own, than they do at present. 

Q.1. There is much scope to increase revenue -- 

(A) with vacant land, excluding a betterment tax. 

(B) from useful land, including a betterment tax. 

(C) from vacant land, for the betterment of country. 

(D) from vacant land, including a betterment tax. 

Answer.(D) 

Q.2. Which of the following statement/s is/are NOT TRUE in context to the passage? 

(A) Reality is that there is no clear-cut mechanism for regular resource transfers to our urban centres. 

(B) Cities must raise far more revenues on their own, than they do at present. 

(C) Our urbanisation process would not remain blighted and stunted, constraining overall economic growth. 

(D) The finance commission report emphasised the huge potential for local generation of funds. 

Answer.(C) 

Q.3. With 27 new cities selected under the Centre’s Smart Cities Mission, _____ 

(A) the total now stands at 42, which was horrible. 

(B) the total now stands at 60, which seems splendid. 

(C) the total now stands at 60, which seems insignificant. 

(D) the total now stands at 60, which does not seem impressive. 

Answer.(B) 

Q.4. Which of the following statement/s is/are TRUE in context to the passage? 

(A) Urban local bodies can decline resources by issuing municipal bonds. 

(B) We need less clear-cut mechanism design for resource transfers to the different cities. 

(C) India’s rising number of proposed smart cities need focused tax and non-tax revenue. 

(D) Taxes like those on hoardings and entertainment, besides octroi, will not get subsumed in the goods and services tax. 

Answer.(C) 

Q.5. Which of the following is possibly the most appropriate TITLE for the passage? 

(A) India and its smart cities 

(B) Large portion of our national income 
(C) No smart cities sans adequate revenues 

(D) Fourteenth Finance Commission 

Answer.(C) 

For several years now, China has been content to let its trade with India grow while blocking forward movement on issues that really matter to New Delhi, ranging from terrorism to the place India perceives for itself on the world stage. Thus, we have seen in the past few months China blocking India’s bid to enter the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) and putting a “technical hold” on New Delhi’s efforts to get the UN Security Council to designate Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed chief Masood Azhar a terrorist. These moves smack of hypocrisy, given Beijing’s questionable track record in both these areas. Despite its offer for more consultations on the NSG issue ahead of the BRICS Summit in Goa, China has already linked India’s membership of the elite group to the candidature of its “iron brother” Pakistan. It is no secret that Pakistan’s nuclear weapons programme grew with support from China, which is also building two atomic reactors in Karachi, which, experts say, do not have the sanction of the NSG. It is, therefore, unusual that China has argued that India’s entry to the NSG will weaken the global non-proliferation regime. 

Q.1.Which country has been blocking India’s bid to enter the NSG? 

(A)Pakistan        (B) China        (C) India                 (D) UN 

Ans. (B) 

Q.2. How many countries are there in BRICS? 

(A) 4                 (B) 5               (C) 3                        (D) 6 

Ans-(B) 

Q.3.Who supports Pakistan for nuclear weapons? 

(A) US                (B) Brazil        (C) China              (D) UN 

Ans-(c) 

Q.4. What is the full form of NSG? 

(A) National Suppliers Group              (B) Nuclear Suppliers Group 

(C) Nuclear Suppliers Gang                 (D) Nuclear Special Group 

Ans-(B) 

Q.5. Who is building two atomic reactors? 

(A) China           (B) India             (C) Pakistan               (D) UN 

Ans-(C) 


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